ISIS Mobile Wallet experience with an NFC enabled phone – Everyday NFC

 

This is a follow up blog about my exploration on the use of the ISIS Mobile Wallet. I needed to return my iPhone ISIS case to the AT&T store since it didn’t work well. I decided to continue my hands on ISIS experience and picked up an Android phone. I chose the HTC One.

Here is what I have performed:

1. Download the ISIS mobile app:

I downloaded the ISIS mobile app from Google Play Store and attempted to sign on to the ISIS mobile wallet. I had forgotten both my password and the answer to my security question. My ISIS account was locked after a few attempts to sign in. With such a security mechanism in place, I felt more comfortable as a mobile wallet user. I called AT&T customer support and they reset the ISIS password for me in a very efficient manner.

2. Set up of the ISIS Mobile Wallet:

To my surprise, my ISIS wallet was empty and I was asked to add all cards into it.

This is the message I received:

This is an important service alert from Isis.

Your Isis Mobile Wallet was transferred to a new phone. Any existing installations of your Isis Mobile Wallet will be disabled while you complete the reinstallation process on your new phone.

As part of this process, you may be required to re-activate Payment Cards by your issuers.

OK, I get it. When I bought a new wallet, I would need to move all of my cards to my new wallet. Since this is a digital world, I expect more from my digital wallet. A better experience would have been for all the cards associated with my wallet being moved to a new phone automatically. Are these cards not associated with my ISIS wallet in the data base? Why do I have to key in all of the information again?

I was also notified that my iPhone wallet was not available. It seems that ISIS only allows one active wallet and each time the wallet needs to be re-associated with all of the cards.

3. Get Jamba Juice:

The experience at the Jamba Juice store was good. This is the store that was having trouble receiving ISIS wallet from the iPhone case. It received ISIS from HTC One instantly. I am happy about the experience.

4. Read NFC tag:

I used the HTC One to scan an NFC tag on my book and it didn’t ask for my permission; “do you want to accept the NFC connection?” as my Galaxy III did. Instead, it scanned the URL in the NFC tag and went to my author’s page at Amazon. It’s good to see the read/write mode working and it’s not good to see that there is no security provided. In this case, when my phone is approaching any NFC tag, it will read it and put the phone in danger of a virus attack.

Overall, it’s a better experience to use an NFC enabled phone to perform ISIS Mobile Wallet activities than using an NFC embedded iPhone case. Stay tuned for more exploration.

Hsuan-hua Chang
From – ISIS Mobile Wallet experience with an NFC enabled phone – Everyday NFC

Frustration over my ISIS enabled iPhone

Frustration over my ISIS enabled iPhone | Everyday NFC (Near Field Communication)

I am getting a bit tired with my ISIS enabled iPhone. The case added weight to my iPhone. Most of the ISIS transactions didn’t work well. The only good thing is that I am getting free drinks from Jamba Juice until the end of March. Other than card emulation mode, none of the other NFC modes work. I can’t tap an NFC tag or an NFC enabled phone with the case to get the full benefits of NFC.  I think I might switch to an Android phone. Most of the Android smartphones are NFC enabled.

Looking back at the history of NFC’s development, I find the situation kind of ironic.  We had an NFC enthusiast, Google, demonstrate NFC card emulation mode’s value by implementing mobile wallet. Telecoms disabled the capability from the phones because they were developing their own mobile wallet solutions and wanted to control SIM-based NFC. So Google dropped SIM-based NFC, the most direct and secured way to protect security and privacy with Secure Element, and implemented HCE (Host Card Emulation) based mobile wallet. Even though it’s not as secure as a SIM-based solution, the HCE solution is beyond the control of telecoms.

Control provokes innovation by requiring creative solutions to market dominant. History repeats!

On the other end, Apple has been filing patents for NFC communication technology but still hasn’t added NFC capability into their devices. Their blue ocean strategy is to find a market space with no competitors. At the same time, their actions have slowed down the adoption of NFC technology and pushed BLE forward. Apple is also exercising a control with its vast user market. Again, innovation will emerge to escape the control. History will repeat.

NFC Solutions Summit 2014 will be held in Austin, TX on June 2-4. I trust that the NFC ecosystem will demonstrate strength and creativity on mobile wallet solutions through collaboration and innovation. Extreme early discount to purchase a ticket is available until April 2nd. Reserve your seat now!

Hsuan-hua Chang

via Frustration over my ISIS enabled iPhone | Everyday NFC (Near Field Communication).