The Overlooked Bond

The Overlooked Bond

 

One of the most undervalued relationships in our society is friendship. While, on an individual level, people appreciate their friends, in books and film friends tend to be sounding boards for the protagonists. Still even more than friends, the relationship between siblings seems to be overlooked most of all.

This isn’t at all the case with parents, possibly because our identities are shaped so much by who raised us. It truly is rare to find a book or movie dedicated to the relationship between siblings, which is one of the most complicated sorts of relationships. Essentially, you are raised with someone who is both a peer, and sometimes, an authority figure. This person could be your friend or not, but either way, they are, on some level, your equal. This person undergoes everything you experience as a child, or at the very least, bears witness. On account of this, there is an understanding about what makes you who you are, and where some of your quirks come from because they have seen your personal history.

I am blessed with 3 siblings. My eldest brother doted on me, always finding a spot on his bicycle that I could sit on and he sang made up songs about us to my sister, brother, and I. He is a natural performer and phone calls with him are like free comedy shows.

My sister invented a whole set of characters that my other brother and I, absolutely transfixed, would interact with for hours. She invented a story called, “The Enchanted Forest,” which guaranteed the three of us were never bored. The goofy brilliance she had as a child, fortunately, never left her, and even now, as adults, we spend a lot of our time laughing our makeup off and getting strange looks from our parents and strangers for inventing odd voices and stories. She never leaves the house without drawing some sort of tragically demented cartoon on the backs of junk mail.

My last brother, only three years my senior, put up with my endless bullying with a zen-like quality I have yet to find in another human being. He, too, would invent games for us to play for hours, which would always distract us from what was going on around us, sometimes to the chagrin of our parents. His boundless kindness was summed up one time when he won a cookie at school and saved it all day to share with me as I was still at home at the time. He was so excited that he ran home, and, on the final step into our house, tripped and broke the cookie everywhere. He instantly burst into tears because he had been so excited to share it with me.

There are no words that could do justice to how much these three weirdos have enriched my life and made me a more interesting, happier person. My family is something I am always grateful for, even in the hardest of times. Well done, Mom and Dad, you’ve done good.

Micaela Gardner

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